Dec 11, 2023

Dec 11, 2023

Dec 11, 2023

3 Essential Steps to Secure Your Email: DKIM Authentication Guide

3 Essential Steps to Secure Your Email: DKIM Authentication Guide

3 Essential Steps to Secure Your Email: DKIM Authentication Guide

3 Essential Steps to Secure Your Email: DKIM Authentication Guide

Author:

By: Anthony Baltodano

DKIM authentication is a pivotal tool for securing email deliverability and protecting your domain's sending reputation.

Whether you're using G Suite, Office 365, or custom SMTP servers, following this easy DKIM setup guide will help strengthen your email security and improve inbox placement.

We'll also look at some common DKIM issues and troubleshooting tips.

Let's dive in!

What Is DKIM And Why Is It Important?

DKIM (DomainKeys Identified Mail) is an email authentication protocol that works by attaching a coded signature to your outgoing messages.

This signature confirms to receiving servers that the emails came from your authorized domain, helping to prevent spoofing and phishing attempts. Think of it as a seal of authenticity that reassures receiving servers: "Yes, this email is genuinely from me.”

Here’s why DKIM isn’t just beneficial but essential:

  • Validates Your Domain Identity: DKIM signatures verify that emails are really coming from your domain, rather than impersonators. This builds trust with ISPs and improves deliverability.

  • Prevents Tampering: The DKIM signature is encrypted using a private key. If the email content gets altered during transit, authentication will fail, protecting message integrity.

  • Boosts Reputation: Proper DKIM configuration demonstrates your commitment to sender best practices. This strengthens your domain's reputation over time.

  • Better Inbox Placement: Emails with valid DKIM signatures are less likely to be flagged as spam. This improves inbox rates.

  • Required for DMARC: DKIM works hand-in-hand with DMARC for enhanced security. DMARC policies can't be enforced without first setting up DKIM (and SPF).

Now that we've seen the critical importance of DKIM for security and deliverability, let's look at how it actually works. Read our case study on how DockAtot achieved 100% deliverability firstly by setting correctly DKIM Authentication with Mission Inbox.

How Does DKIM Authentication Work?

The DKIM authentication process involves cryptographic signing and key management.

Here's a quick rundown:

  • Select Email Fields: Configure which header fields should be included in the signature (From, Subject, etc). These are hashed.

  • Private Key: Your email server uses a private key to encrypt the hashed header values, creating the DKIM signature.

  • Public Key: Your public key gets published in a DNS TXT record. Receiving servers use this to decrypt the signature.

  • Verify Signature: If the signature decrypts properly using your public key, the email is authenticated as coming from you!

  • Check Alignment: The receiving server also checks that the hashed headers match the email content. If anything changed in transit, verification fails.


That's the essence of how a DKIM signature enables authentication!

With these basics in mind, let’s roll up our sleeves and dive into setting up DKIM for your domain.

Step 1: Generate DKIM Cryptographic Keys

The first step is to generate your public and private DKIM keys.

There are a few options here:

  • SMTP Servers: If you use Postfix, Sendmail, or Exchange, these typically include DKIM key generation tools. Check your server's documentation.

  • Command Line Tools: Open source tools like opendkim and dkim-filter can generate keys. Useful for Linux admins.

  • Email Services: Providers like Mailjet, SendGrid, MailChimp, etc. have DKIM tools built-in to generate keys for your domains.

  • Manual Creation: You can also use OpenSSL to manually create keys. More complex but gives you full control.

The key length can be 1024 or 2048 bits. 2048 provides enhanced security. The keys will consist of a random string beginning with k=rsa;.

Once you've generated your public/private key pair, it's time to publish the public key, so receiving servers can find it.

Step 2: Publish Your DKIM Public Key in DNS TXT Records

Now that you have your keys, you need to add a DNS TXT record containing your public key. This allows recipients to discover and validate your DKIM signature.

To publish your public key:

  • Create TXT Record: In your domain's DNS management console, create a new TXT record.

  • Set Hostname: Enter _domainkey as the hostname. (E.g. _domainkey.yourdomain.com.)

  • Paste Public Key: Copy your full public key string into the TXT value field.

  • Save record: Save the TXT entry and give DNS time to propagate the change.

Once this is set up, remote servers can query your domain's DNS for the _domainkey TXT record to find your public key for signature verification.

Step 3: Activate DKIM Signing for Outbound Email

The last step is enabling DKIM signing on your outbound email server or service.

This will start the process of creating DKIM signatures for all your outgoing messages:

  • SMTP Servers: Enable any DKIM-related plugins and enter your private key.

  • Email Services: Follow provider instructions to enable DKIM signing using your private key.

  • DKIM Signing Tools: Milters like opendkim can add DKIM signing to SMTP traffic.

  • Domain Settings: Some domain hosts include DKIM signing options in your control panel.

Once enabled, DKIM signing will embed signatures into your emails automatically using the private key. With your public key published, you now have a complete DKIM authentication flow!

DKIM Troubleshooting Tips

Now that DKIM is set up for your domain, here are some troubleshooting tips to ensure everything is working properly:

  • Use DKIM testing tools like Port25's DKIM Verifier to confirm records are set up correctly.

  • Check DNS propagation and give at least 48 hours for TXT records to distribute before testing.

  • Double check TXT syntax like quotations marks and other formatting that may cause issues.

  • Monitor DKIM alignment failures in email logs and adjust included headers if needed.

  • Rotate keys periodically and stagger key rollover to avoid authentication gaps.

  • Review DMARC reports for DKIM alignment issues and failures.

  • Check reputation monitoring tools to catch DKIM problems before they impact deliverability.

With some vigilance, you can stay on top of any potential DKIM issues before they threaten your sending reputation.

Putting It All Together

Following these 3 simple steps will get DKIM authentication set up for your domain:

  1. Generate Keys: Create your public and private DKIM key pair.

  2. Publish Public Key: Add a DNS TXT record with your public key.

  3. Enable Signing: Activate DKIM signing on your outbound email.

With major email providers like Gmail and Yahoo announcing that DKIM will be a requirement for all bulk email senders by 2024, it's more important than ever to get this set up correctly.

Read this blog on how to adapt your tactics for email marketing before the 2024 Updates!

Use a tool like Mission Inbox

DKIM can be a complex issue, but is an essential tool for establishing your domain as a trusted sender. Combined with DMARC and SPF policies, these authentication mechanisms form a powerful framework for email security and integrity.

Use a tool like Mission Inbox to experience the power of emails that reach their destination every time!

How does Mission Inbox help with email deliverability?

Mission Inbox platform is a Mailbox host dedicated to boosts email deliverability through several key features: Firstly, our real-time email verification ensures that your emails are sent only to verified addresses, reducing bounce rates. Secondly, each client gets a dedicated server/IP, which enhances sender reputation and avoids issues associated with shared IP addresses. Additionally, our automated warm-up process and email health reports help maintain and monitor mailbox health.

Together, these features work to ensure that your emails not only reach their destination but also engage your audience effectively.

Get early access now by clicking this link!

DKIM authentication is a pivotal tool for securing email deliverability and protecting your domain's sending reputation.

Whether you're using G Suite, Office 365, or custom SMTP servers, following this easy DKIM setup guide will help strengthen your email security and improve inbox placement.

We'll also look at some common DKIM issues and troubleshooting tips.

Let's dive in!

What Is DKIM And Why Is It Important?

DKIM (DomainKeys Identified Mail) is an email authentication protocol that works by attaching a coded signature to your outgoing messages.

This signature confirms to receiving servers that the emails came from your authorized domain, helping to prevent spoofing and phishing attempts. Think of it as a seal of authenticity that reassures receiving servers: "Yes, this email is genuinely from me.”

Here’s why DKIM isn’t just beneficial but essential:

  • Validates Your Domain Identity: DKIM signatures verify that emails are really coming from your domain, rather than impersonators. This builds trust with ISPs and improves deliverability.

  • Prevents Tampering: The DKIM signature is encrypted using a private key. If the email content gets altered during transit, authentication will fail, protecting message integrity.

  • Boosts Reputation: Proper DKIM configuration demonstrates your commitment to sender best practices. This strengthens your domain's reputation over time.

  • Better Inbox Placement: Emails with valid DKIM signatures are less likely to be flagged as spam. This improves inbox rates.

  • Required for DMARC: DKIM works hand-in-hand with DMARC for enhanced security. DMARC policies can't be enforced without first setting up DKIM (and SPF).

Now that we've seen the critical importance of DKIM for security and deliverability, let's look at how it actually works. Read our case study on how DockAtot achieved 100% deliverability firstly by setting correctly DKIM Authentication with Mission Inbox.

How Does DKIM Authentication Work?

The DKIM authentication process involves cryptographic signing and key management.

Here's a quick rundown:

  • Select Email Fields: Configure which header fields should be included in the signature (From, Subject, etc). These are hashed.

  • Private Key: Your email server uses a private key to encrypt the hashed header values, creating the DKIM signature.

  • Public Key: Your public key gets published in a DNS TXT record. Receiving servers use this to decrypt the signature.

  • Verify Signature: If the signature decrypts properly using your public key, the email is authenticated as coming from you!

  • Check Alignment: The receiving server also checks that the hashed headers match the email content. If anything changed in transit, verification fails.


That's the essence of how a DKIM signature enables authentication!

With these basics in mind, let’s roll up our sleeves and dive into setting up DKIM for your domain.

Step 1: Generate DKIM Cryptographic Keys

The first step is to generate your public and private DKIM keys.

There are a few options here:

  • SMTP Servers: If you use Postfix, Sendmail, or Exchange, these typically include DKIM key generation tools. Check your server's documentation.

  • Command Line Tools: Open source tools like opendkim and dkim-filter can generate keys. Useful for Linux admins.

  • Email Services: Providers like Mailjet, SendGrid, MailChimp, etc. have DKIM tools built-in to generate keys for your domains.

  • Manual Creation: You can also use OpenSSL to manually create keys. More complex but gives you full control.

The key length can be 1024 or 2048 bits. 2048 provides enhanced security. The keys will consist of a random string beginning with k=rsa;.

Once you've generated your public/private key pair, it's time to publish the public key, so receiving servers can find it.

Step 2: Publish Your DKIM Public Key in DNS TXT Records

Now that you have your keys, you need to add a DNS TXT record containing your public key. This allows recipients to discover and validate your DKIM signature.

To publish your public key:

  • Create TXT Record: In your domain's DNS management console, create a new TXT record.

  • Set Hostname: Enter _domainkey as the hostname. (E.g. _domainkey.yourdomain.com.)

  • Paste Public Key: Copy your full public key string into the TXT value field.

  • Save record: Save the TXT entry and give DNS time to propagate the change.

Once this is set up, remote servers can query your domain's DNS for the _domainkey TXT record to find your public key for signature verification.

Step 3: Activate DKIM Signing for Outbound Email

The last step is enabling DKIM signing on your outbound email server or service.

This will start the process of creating DKIM signatures for all your outgoing messages:

  • SMTP Servers: Enable any DKIM-related plugins and enter your private key.

  • Email Services: Follow provider instructions to enable DKIM signing using your private key.

  • DKIM Signing Tools: Milters like opendkim can add DKIM signing to SMTP traffic.

  • Domain Settings: Some domain hosts include DKIM signing options in your control panel.

Once enabled, DKIM signing will embed signatures into your emails automatically using the private key. With your public key published, you now have a complete DKIM authentication flow!

DKIM Troubleshooting Tips

Now that DKIM is set up for your domain, here are some troubleshooting tips to ensure everything is working properly:

  • Use DKIM testing tools like Port25's DKIM Verifier to confirm records are set up correctly.

  • Check DNS propagation and give at least 48 hours for TXT records to distribute before testing.

  • Double check TXT syntax like quotations marks and other formatting that may cause issues.

  • Monitor DKIM alignment failures in email logs and adjust included headers if needed.

  • Rotate keys periodically and stagger key rollover to avoid authentication gaps.

  • Review DMARC reports for DKIM alignment issues and failures.

  • Check reputation monitoring tools to catch DKIM problems before they impact deliverability.

With some vigilance, you can stay on top of any potential DKIM issues before they threaten your sending reputation.

Putting It All Together

Following these 3 simple steps will get DKIM authentication set up for your domain:

  1. Generate Keys: Create your public and private DKIM key pair.

  2. Publish Public Key: Add a DNS TXT record with your public key.

  3. Enable Signing: Activate DKIM signing on your outbound email.

With major email providers like Gmail and Yahoo announcing that DKIM will be a requirement for all bulk email senders by 2024, it's more important than ever to get this set up correctly.

Read this blog on how to adapt your tactics for email marketing before the 2024 Updates!

Use a tool like Mission Inbox

DKIM can be a complex issue, but is an essential tool for establishing your domain as a trusted sender. Combined with DMARC and SPF policies, these authentication mechanisms form a powerful framework for email security and integrity.

Use a tool like Mission Inbox to experience the power of emails that reach their destination every time!

How does Mission Inbox help with email deliverability?

Mission Inbox platform is a Mailbox host dedicated to boosts email deliverability through several key features: Firstly, our real-time email verification ensures that your emails are sent only to verified addresses, reducing bounce rates. Secondly, each client gets a dedicated server/IP, which enhances sender reputation and avoids issues associated with shared IP addresses. Additionally, our automated warm-up process and email health reports help maintain and monitor mailbox health.

Together, these features work to ensure that your emails not only reach their destination but also engage your audience effectively.

Get early access now by clicking this link!

DKIM authentication is a pivotal tool for securing email deliverability and protecting your domain's sending reputation.

Whether you're using G Suite, Office 365, or custom SMTP servers, following this easy DKIM setup guide will help strengthen your email security and improve inbox placement.

We'll also look at some common DKIM issues and troubleshooting tips.

Let's dive in!

What Is DKIM And Why Is It Important?

DKIM (DomainKeys Identified Mail) is an email authentication protocol that works by attaching a coded signature to your outgoing messages.

This signature confirms to receiving servers that the emails came from your authorized domain, helping to prevent spoofing and phishing attempts. Think of it as a seal of authenticity that reassures receiving servers: "Yes, this email is genuinely from me.”

Here’s why DKIM isn’t just beneficial but essential:

  • Validates Your Domain Identity: DKIM signatures verify that emails are really coming from your domain, rather than impersonators. This builds trust with ISPs and improves deliverability.

  • Prevents Tampering: The DKIM signature is encrypted using a private key. If the email content gets altered during transit, authentication will fail, protecting message integrity.

  • Boosts Reputation: Proper DKIM configuration demonstrates your commitment to sender best practices. This strengthens your domain's reputation over time.

  • Better Inbox Placement: Emails with valid DKIM signatures are less likely to be flagged as spam. This improves inbox rates.

  • Required for DMARC: DKIM works hand-in-hand with DMARC for enhanced security. DMARC policies can't be enforced without first setting up DKIM (and SPF).

Now that we've seen the critical importance of DKIM for security and deliverability, let's look at how it actually works. Read our case study on how DockAtot achieved 100% deliverability firstly by setting correctly DKIM Authentication with Mission Inbox.

How Does DKIM Authentication Work?

The DKIM authentication process involves cryptographic signing and key management.

Here's a quick rundown:

  • Select Email Fields: Configure which header fields should be included in the signature (From, Subject, etc). These are hashed.

  • Private Key: Your email server uses a private key to encrypt the hashed header values, creating the DKIM signature.

  • Public Key: Your public key gets published in a DNS TXT record. Receiving servers use this to decrypt the signature.

  • Verify Signature: If the signature decrypts properly using your public key, the email is authenticated as coming from you!

  • Check Alignment: The receiving server also checks that the hashed headers match the email content. If anything changed in transit, verification fails.


That's the essence of how a DKIM signature enables authentication!

With these basics in mind, let’s roll up our sleeves and dive into setting up DKIM for your domain.

Step 1: Generate DKIM Cryptographic Keys

The first step is to generate your public and private DKIM keys.

There are a few options here:

  • SMTP Servers: If you use Postfix, Sendmail, or Exchange, these typically include DKIM key generation tools. Check your server's documentation.

  • Command Line Tools: Open source tools like opendkim and dkim-filter can generate keys. Useful for Linux admins.

  • Email Services: Providers like Mailjet, SendGrid, MailChimp, etc. have DKIM tools built-in to generate keys for your domains.

  • Manual Creation: You can also use OpenSSL to manually create keys. More complex but gives you full control.

The key length can be 1024 or 2048 bits. 2048 provides enhanced security. The keys will consist of a random string beginning with k=rsa;.

Once you've generated your public/private key pair, it's time to publish the public key, so receiving servers can find it.

Step 2: Publish Your DKIM Public Key in DNS TXT Records

Now that you have your keys, you need to add a DNS TXT record containing your public key. This allows recipients to discover and validate your DKIM signature.

To publish your public key:

  • Create TXT Record: In your domain's DNS management console, create a new TXT record.

  • Set Hostname: Enter _domainkey as the hostname. (E.g. _domainkey.yourdomain.com.)

  • Paste Public Key: Copy your full public key string into the TXT value field.

  • Save record: Save the TXT entry and give DNS time to propagate the change.

Once this is set up, remote servers can query your domain's DNS for the _domainkey TXT record to find your public key for signature verification.

Step 3: Activate DKIM Signing for Outbound Email

The last step is enabling DKIM signing on your outbound email server or service.

This will start the process of creating DKIM signatures for all your outgoing messages:

  • SMTP Servers: Enable any DKIM-related plugins and enter your private key.

  • Email Services: Follow provider instructions to enable DKIM signing using your private key.

  • DKIM Signing Tools: Milters like opendkim can add DKIM signing to SMTP traffic.

  • Domain Settings: Some domain hosts include DKIM signing options in your control panel.

Once enabled, DKIM signing will embed signatures into your emails automatically using the private key. With your public key published, you now have a complete DKIM authentication flow!

DKIM Troubleshooting Tips

Now that DKIM is set up for your domain, here are some troubleshooting tips to ensure everything is working properly:

  • Use DKIM testing tools like Port25's DKIM Verifier to confirm records are set up correctly.

  • Check DNS propagation and give at least 48 hours for TXT records to distribute before testing.

  • Double check TXT syntax like quotations marks and other formatting that may cause issues.

  • Monitor DKIM alignment failures in email logs and adjust included headers if needed.

  • Rotate keys periodically and stagger key rollover to avoid authentication gaps.

  • Review DMARC reports for DKIM alignment issues and failures.

  • Check reputation monitoring tools to catch DKIM problems before they impact deliverability.

With some vigilance, you can stay on top of any potential DKIM issues before they threaten your sending reputation.

Putting It All Together

Following these 3 simple steps will get DKIM authentication set up for your domain:

  1. Generate Keys: Create your public and private DKIM key pair.

  2. Publish Public Key: Add a DNS TXT record with your public key.

  3. Enable Signing: Activate DKIM signing on your outbound email.

With major email providers like Gmail and Yahoo announcing that DKIM will be a requirement for all bulk email senders by 2024, it's more important than ever to get this set up correctly.

Read this blog on how to adapt your tactics for email marketing before the 2024 Updates!

Use a tool like Mission Inbox

DKIM can be a complex issue, but is an essential tool for establishing your domain as a trusted sender. Combined with DMARC and SPF policies, these authentication mechanisms form a powerful framework for email security and integrity.

Use a tool like Mission Inbox to experience the power of emails that reach their destination every time!

How does Mission Inbox help with email deliverability?

Mission Inbox platform is a Mailbox host dedicated to boosts email deliverability through several key features: Firstly, our real-time email verification ensures that your emails are sent only to verified addresses, reducing bounce rates. Secondly, each client gets a dedicated server/IP, which enhances sender reputation and avoids issues associated with shared IP addresses. Additionally, our automated warm-up process and email health reports help maintain and monitor mailbox health.

Together, these features work to ensure that your emails not only reach their destination but also engage your audience effectively.

Get early access now by clicking this link!

DKIM authentication is a pivotal tool for securing email deliverability and protecting your domain's sending reputation.

Whether you're using G Suite, Office 365, or custom SMTP servers, following this easy DKIM setup guide will help strengthen your email security and improve inbox placement.

We'll also look at some common DKIM issues and troubleshooting tips.

Let's dive in!

What Is DKIM And Why Is It Important?

DKIM (DomainKeys Identified Mail) is an email authentication protocol that works by attaching a coded signature to your outgoing messages.

This signature confirms to receiving servers that the emails came from your authorized domain, helping to prevent spoofing and phishing attempts. Think of it as a seal of authenticity that reassures receiving servers: "Yes, this email is genuinely from me.”

Here’s why DKIM isn’t just beneficial but essential:

  • Validates Your Domain Identity: DKIM signatures verify that emails are really coming from your domain, rather than impersonators. This builds trust with ISPs and improves deliverability.

  • Prevents Tampering: The DKIM signature is encrypted using a private key. If the email content gets altered during transit, authentication will fail, protecting message integrity.

  • Boosts Reputation: Proper DKIM configuration demonstrates your commitment to sender best practices. This strengthens your domain's reputation over time.

  • Better Inbox Placement: Emails with valid DKIM signatures are less likely to be flagged as spam. This improves inbox rates.

  • Required for DMARC: DKIM works hand-in-hand with DMARC for enhanced security. DMARC policies can't be enforced without first setting up DKIM (and SPF).

Now that we've seen the critical importance of DKIM for security and deliverability, let's look at how it actually works. Read our case study on how DockAtot achieved 100% deliverability firstly by setting correctly DKIM Authentication with Mission Inbox.

How Does DKIM Authentication Work?

The DKIM authentication process involves cryptographic signing and key management.

Here's a quick rundown:

  • Select Email Fields: Configure which header fields should be included in the signature (From, Subject, etc). These are hashed.

  • Private Key: Your email server uses a private key to encrypt the hashed header values, creating the DKIM signature.

  • Public Key: Your public key gets published in a DNS TXT record. Receiving servers use this to decrypt the signature.

  • Verify Signature: If the signature decrypts properly using your public key, the email is authenticated as coming from you!

  • Check Alignment: The receiving server also checks that the hashed headers match the email content. If anything changed in transit, verification fails.


That's the essence of how a DKIM signature enables authentication!

With these basics in mind, let’s roll up our sleeves and dive into setting up DKIM for your domain.

Step 1: Generate DKIM Cryptographic Keys

The first step is to generate your public and private DKIM keys.

There are a few options here:

  • SMTP Servers: If you use Postfix, Sendmail, or Exchange, these typically include DKIM key generation tools. Check your server's documentation.

  • Command Line Tools: Open source tools like opendkim and dkim-filter can generate keys. Useful for Linux admins.

  • Email Services: Providers like Mailjet, SendGrid, MailChimp, etc. have DKIM tools built-in to generate keys for your domains.

  • Manual Creation: You can also use OpenSSL to manually create keys. More complex but gives you full control.

The key length can be 1024 or 2048 bits. 2048 provides enhanced security. The keys will consist of a random string beginning with k=rsa;.

Once you've generated your public/private key pair, it's time to publish the public key, so receiving servers can find it.

Step 2: Publish Your DKIM Public Key in DNS TXT Records

Now that you have your keys, you need to add a DNS TXT record containing your public key. This allows recipients to discover and validate your DKIM signature.

To publish your public key:

  • Create TXT Record: In your domain's DNS management console, create a new TXT record.

  • Set Hostname: Enter _domainkey as the hostname. (E.g. _domainkey.yourdomain.com.)

  • Paste Public Key: Copy your full public key string into the TXT value field.

  • Save record: Save the TXT entry and give DNS time to propagate the change.

Once this is set up, remote servers can query your domain's DNS for the _domainkey TXT record to find your public key for signature verification.

Step 3: Activate DKIM Signing for Outbound Email

The last step is enabling DKIM signing on your outbound email server or service.

This will start the process of creating DKIM signatures for all your outgoing messages:

  • SMTP Servers: Enable any DKIM-related plugins and enter your private key.

  • Email Services: Follow provider instructions to enable DKIM signing using your private key.

  • DKIM Signing Tools: Milters like opendkim can add DKIM signing to SMTP traffic.

  • Domain Settings: Some domain hosts include DKIM signing options in your control panel.

Once enabled, DKIM signing will embed signatures into your emails automatically using the private key. With your public key published, you now have a complete DKIM authentication flow!

DKIM Troubleshooting Tips

Now that DKIM is set up for your domain, here are some troubleshooting tips to ensure everything is working properly:

  • Use DKIM testing tools like Port25's DKIM Verifier to confirm records are set up correctly.

  • Check DNS propagation and give at least 48 hours for TXT records to distribute before testing.

  • Double check TXT syntax like quotations marks and other formatting that may cause issues.

  • Monitor DKIM alignment failures in email logs and adjust included headers if needed.

  • Rotate keys periodically and stagger key rollover to avoid authentication gaps.

  • Review DMARC reports for DKIM alignment issues and failures.

  • Check reputation monitoring tools to catch DKIM problems before they impact deliverability.

With some vigilance, you can stay on top of any potential DKIM issues before they threaten your sending reputation.

Putting It All Together

Following these 3 simple steps will get DKIM authentication set up for your domain:

  1. Generate Keys: Create your public and private DKIM key pair.

  2. Publish Public Key: Add a DNS TXT record with your public key.

  3. Enable Signing: Activate DKIM signing on your outbound email.

With major email providers like Gmail and Yahoo announcing that DKIM will be a requirement for all bulk email senders by 2024, it's more important than ever to get this set up correctly.

Read this blog on how to adapt your tactics for email marketing before the 2024 Updates!

Use a tool like Mission Inbox

DKIM can be a complex issue, but is an essential tool for establishing your domain as a trusted sender. Combined with DMARC and SPF policies, these authentication mechanisms form a powerful framework for email security and integrity.

Use a tool like Mission Inbox to experience the power of emails that reach their destination every time!

How does Mission Inbox help with email deliverability?

Mission Inbox platform is a Mailbox host dedicated to boosts email deliverability through several key features: Firstly, our real-time email verification ensures that your emails are sent only to verified addresses, reducing bounce rates. Secondly, each client gets a dedicated server/IP, which enhances sender reputation and avoids issues associated with shared IP addresses. Additionally, our automated warm-up process and email health reports help maintain and monitor mailbox health.

Together, these features work to ensure that your emails not only reach their destination but also engage your audience effectively.

Get early access now by clicking this link!

It’s easy to get started. Start now

It’s easy to get started. Start now

It’s easy to get started. Start now

It’s easy to get started. Start now

Our platform enables you to monitor and optimize every email deliverability component (IPs, Domains, Mailboxes) to guarantee your emails land in the inbox.

Contact Details

Austin, Texas,

United States

+1 (646) 722-0484

hey@missioninbox.com

© 2023 Mission Inbox LLC, All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy

Our platform enables you to monitor and optimize every email deliverability component (IPs, Domains, Mailboxes) to guarantee your emails land in the inbox.

Contact Details

Austin, Texas,

United States

+1 (646) 722-0484

hey@missioninbox.com

© 2023 Mission Inbox LLC, All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy

Our platform enables you to monitor and optimize every email deliverability component (IPs, Domains, Mailboxes) to guarantee your emails land in the inbox.

Contact Details

Amsterdam

United States

+1 (646) 722-0484

hey@missioninbox.com

© 2023 Mission Inbox LLC, All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy

Our platform enables you to monitor and optimize every email deliverability component (IPs, Domains, Mailboxes) to guarantee your emails land in the inbox.

Contact Details

Austin, Texas,

United States

+1 (646) 722-0484

hey@missioninbox.com

© 2023 Mission Inbox LLC, All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy